For a less-extreme cleanse, consider occasionally replacing a meal with fresh vegetable or fruit juice. “In moderation, or as an alternative to eating fruits and veggies, this can be a great way to supplement your meals and snacks,” Jantz says. “Juicing is a great way to concentrate the phytochemicals and nutrients found in veggies and fruits.” When you do it on your own at home, it’s also a lot less expensive than a prebottled system.
You may like to post the nutrition panels along with the ingredients. For instance the “toxic agave” that’s “loaded with fructose” is in the slim cakes. This product has a total sugar amount of only 4 grams. This includes the sugar from the cranberries and sugar. So the amount from the organic agave is minuscule. You really have to put things in perspective. If you were drinking a bottle of organic agave everyday you might have problems:)
The bottom line is that a cleanse might seem innocent enough for speedy weight loss, but it can have serious consequences for your health and metabolism, especially if you have any medical conditions. If you’re really interested in trying a cleanse, get your doctor’s go-ahead and guidance, so you can reap the benefits of fruits and vegetables without putting your health at risk.
The same article you pulled the table from up at the beginning. You neglected to include the table at the end of Dr Mercola’s article recommending avoiding honey due to fructose. http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/09/09/ethanol-alcohol-and-fructose.aspx. Organic Agave is fine, the amount of it is small. The supposed issue with fructose is in high amounts, all Isagnenix products are formulated low GI so they don’t cause a spike in insulin. That’s why diabetics do so well on the program.

The SHRED Power Cleanse If you have two weeks to commit, this program by Dr. Ian a great one to consider. Why? Because it's filled with whole, nutritious, fiber-rich foods, a common sense approach to eating and an exercise program that is based on smart science. It is not designed to be a weight loss program, but you're likely to lose weight while you're on it. And during the program, you learn healthy lifestyle habits (like planning ahead and journaling) that you can use for long-term weight loss and weight maintenance. 
So happy to see people finally hearing the truth about these products. I have been with Isagenix for 13 years and am tired of the scam being run on customers. The products are no better than typical vitamins that can be bought at Target or Walmart. Further, the claims of financial freedom are completely overblown. Almost no one makes money in Isagenix!

Shakes, fads, and quick fixes are temporary fixes to a bigger issue in my opinion. Yeah, I can detox, drink shakes and a few healthy meals a day but am I willing to do that for the rest of my life so I can lose weight? Hell no. I’ll stick to eating 6 times a day, eating my dozen egg whites and veggies, chicken and tilapia. I’d rather invest my money in real food.


Anyway, I saw someone that I knew was saying they had good results and had lost a lot of weight in a short amount of time, so I wanted to know what they were using. That person connected me with their rep/coach who sent me a link to watch a video, and the rep gave me a call (sorry I am using all kind of incorrect pronouns – just trying to respect their anonymity). The rep mentioned a food package and I immediately thought about nutri-system with the prepackaged meals, but I learned that basically the food is supplements, bars, wafers, etc.

There is something to be said about understand each individual’s needs in combination with the environment. True, the soil is depleted, pesticides, and pollutants have effected and affected the growth of whole foods to a point where it just isn’t realistic to get what we needs anymore. In cases like myself, people are starting to become allergic to things that they once were not. In my case onions, radishes, and green peppers for goodness sake. I can not eat them raw. I tried organic grown in the best of conditions and still I have to have them cooked.
– Dr. Suk Cho – Dr. Cho received his B.S. in Biochemistry at Juniata College, his M.S. in natural product chemistry at Miami University, and his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry at Emory University. He has more than 30 patents and has authored or co-authored more than a dozen articles or abstracts in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Previously, Dr. Cho served on the Scientific Advisory Board or in upper-level management of R&D for a variety of nutrition-related companies. He was also R&D manager for global consumer product giant Unilever for nearly a decade.
A short juice cleanse might not pose an immediate danger to most people, but going all-juice might have more subtle risks, experts warn. “This type of diet is like shock treatment to the body,” says Meredith Luce, RD, a nutrition consultant with the Rosen Medical Center in Florida. “By eating one day and fasting the next, you stimulate the body’s starvation response. When you do eat again, your body hoards calories, making long-term weight loss more difficult.” Another problem Luce notes is that dietary cleanses don’t instill healthy eating habits. "Cleanses of this type allow people to justify bad behavior,” she says. “In other words, ‘I’ll eat and drink whatever I want this week, because I’m doing a cleanse next week.’ Cleanses promote the mentality of a quick fix as opposed to long-term balance.”
It was as if no one had actually read what I wrote. No one bothered to address any of my specific criticisms. No one even tried to defend Isagenix's false claims that toxicity accounts for most disease, that the body protects itself from toxins by coating them with fat, and that internal organs become clogged and deteriorate if you don't cleanse. No one offered any evidence that “detoxification” improves human health. No one tried to identify any of the alleged toxins or show that they are actually removed. No one tried to provide any rationale for the particular combination of ingredients (all 242 of them!) in Isagenix products. No one questioned my assertion that “no caffeine added” is inaccurate labeling because green tea, which is added, contains caffeine. No one commented when I observed that the amount of vitamin A in these products is dangerous and goes against the recommendations of the Medical Letter. No one offered any evidence that more weight is lost by adding Isagenix to a low-calorie diet and exercise. I offered some alternative explanations that might account for people believing that Isagenix is effective when it isn't; no one commented on that.
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