With this new-found popularity, the number and type of cleanse diets has soared, from food-based "liver detoxes" to liquid-only fasts for several weeks and everything in between. While the extreme cleanses often get a bad rap—Beyonce confessed that drinking the maple syrup-lemon-cayenne pepper concoction made her "cranky"—many women swear by cleanse diets to lose weight, increase energy, and even help clear up acne.

So should we also only take medicine that is natural from the earth as well? Should we leave it up to our bodies to cure itself without the aid of doctors? I am not understanding this post at all. Science with foods and nutrition is awesome. Our foods are tainted with all kinds of pesticides and poisons. Their are pollutants in the air that your breathing in daily. So you need products to help you get rid of the toxins in your body. The other option would be to just stop breathing as this post would suggest. This is just another nonsense post without any real facts to back it up. It’s all opinion and to my knowledge, people these days are too opinionated. You want to advise people, then spend the years needed and get well informed before you speak on such matters. Thanks for the comments, but no thanks!
It is talking about the overconsumption of fructose, and especially when used in large amounts in beverages and sweets. Because when found in fruits, there is fibre and other nutrients/bulk to help balance out the sugar (and also slow its absorption), as well as reduce the likelihood of overconsumption — because you’ll feel full faster eating an apple than drinking a Coke.
I too am a health coach and would NEVER use my credentials to further an MLM business. People trust us and come to us when they have no other place to turn. To drain their pocketbooks and push them to a lifestyle that does not give them any recourse but to stay on an unhealthy program or risk gaining all the weight back is unethical and cruel. You are no better than Jenny Craig or Nutri System… geared toward customers for life. Call yourself what you are… an Isagenix Rep, but please don’t confuse that with a HEALTH coach.
This has been a very interesting read – the article and the comments. I know that anyone who is an affiliate of Isagenix will defend the product because, well, their livelihood and reputation are on the line. Also they believe it is beneficial and wholesome,which is how they can sell it (I know some people are OK lying in order to get a sale, but I think deep down most people want to sell things that they truly think hold value).
This is great information. I started this program on Monday, unfortunately without researching it properly. Like the other advocates who responded to your blog, the person who got me going on it is very gung ho. I don’t feel any different than I did before I started, except that I’m hungry all the time. I’ve decided that I can lose weight better on my own, without all the processed stuff. Keep up the good work!

On the “cleansing days,” use the actual Isagenix cleansing product called Cleanse For Life. This product is available in either powder or liquid form and has a natural, rich berry flavor to keep your taste-buds satisfied. This product is not a diuretic, but instead it feeds and nourishes the body with over 100 different nutrients including ionic minerals, antioxidants, and cleansing herbs. Not only that, but it also boosts mental and physical performance while protecting the cells and vital organs from aging! To follow the cleansing program properly, mix 4 ounces of Cleanse For Life with 4 ounces of purified water four times a day. Additionally, it is important to take Natural Accelerator capsules (which metabolize your body fat and are packed with thermogenic ingredients like cayenne, green tea, ginseng, and cinnamon), Isagenix Snacks!, which help your digestive system, as well as IsaDelight Plus, which assists in mental clarity and helps to ease sugar cravings. Lastly, Joy advises that it’s important to drink lots of water in addition to this, so that you continue to flush the body out of all the toxins as well as possible.
Hey Dana, I have read your reviews on multiple products, and from what I’ve seen, you seem to do you best to take the worst parts of the entire product line and put them on blast, suggesting everything about the rest of the line is “toxic”, “harmful”, “rancid”…etc. Although you may have a world of knowledge, experience is the best education. I have been on Advocare and Isagenix, and although I don’t disagree with your opinion that Advocare isn’t good, just like your post about Isagenix, you have made it seem far worse that what it is. The fact of the matter is that Isagenix is making a difference in the health and wellbeing of many of the product users. I personally lost 43 pounds using Isagenix and the products were a large upgrade to Advocares ingredients (I think you will agree). A fair article doesn’t stand completely one sided on a subject, but looks at the good as well as the bad. Makes what you write appear to be completely bias.
– Dr. John Anderson – Dr. Anderson made extensive plant tissue studies in organic soil. He discovered ionic minerals. In 1980, he translated his knowledge to the nutritional field. He has worked as a private-label supplement manufacturer and formulator for more than 600 companies, including GNC, Nature’s Sunshine, MetRx; creating more than 2,300 nutritional and weight loss products. His products are internationally recognized.
If my students wrote a review like this they would get an F. The ingredients may come from Isagenix but your “facts” are not supported and are conflicting. Despite saying the use genetically modified ingredients you later state that you “doubt” that the products are non-GMO. That alone brings all other statements into question. You should back up your statements of the “toxic ingredients” with references, or are they specifically your opinion? Finally, you have neglected to reference your education/expertise.
Actually losing 1lb per day is unhealthy even if you are overweight. If you are losing any more than 3lb per week you are more than likely losing muscle mass and not fat. Healthy weight loss should be steady and maintainable. You shouldn’t be consuming less than your base metabolic rate unless advised to do so by a qualified health professional – and there are very few situations in which they will advise you to do so.
I realize that I must sound like an infomercial: “I have a magical bean that will make all your problems go away!”. Here is a kicker though, it is NOT an easy week. This weight loss cleanse can take a toll on anyone, so read the instructions carefully and prepare accordingly. Get rid of all junk food in the house, grab groceries for the week, prepare you meals… And figure out what to do on the weekend, so that it won’t ruin your progress.
This isn’t the only company that uses this tactic. Beachbody (maker of some great workout DVDs) is an MLM that sells a product called Shakeology in addition to the workout programs. The vast majority of Shakeology customers are also sales affiliates (or “coaches” as they call them). The shake costs $115 A MONTH(a little less if you are a coach), and the claims that these coaches make are ridiculous, unfounded, and irresponsible. They claim that Shakeology cured their IBS, helps them manage their diabetes, got them off a whole slew of medications, etc. (look at their Facebook page for a small sampling). If you say $115 a month is too expensive, they’ll tell you that a) it’s NOT expensive when you consider people spend that much on Starbucks, and b) well, you save $30 if you sign up as a coach under me. I was intrigued, so I figured I would do some research. EVERY page that I came across about Shakeology was written by a Beachbody Coach. If you type in “Shakeology scam,” you are directed to a site with an article that explains why Shakeology is NOT a scam. Type in “Shakeology pyramid”, “shakeology sucks”, you get articles written by Beachbody coaches saying why Shakeology is NOT those things. You need to be careful with these MLMs. They have a way of brainwashing their sales people
Dr. Harriet Hall writes more below about the junk science behind Isagenix. In short, there are no proven benefits to using the Isagenix products. Users of the products may offer anecdotes about their success with them, but that is not the same as having independent scientific studies supporting such claims. Of course, Isagenix prohibits reps from making medical claims about the products, but such a prohibition never seems to stop the distributors in any company.
This article is actually ridiculous. I will continue to feed these products to not only myself, but also to my 1 year old son, and my husband. No one in my family needs to lose weight. We don’t need extra money, we eat organic local food, and I have plenty of time to cook, however, I have done my research and have taken these products to my doctor, and I know that Isagenix is one of the best things I could ever put into mine and my families bodies. I am sorry that you are missing out. Your loss.
In looking back at this whole kerfuffle, it became clear to me that there had been a colossal barrier to communication. The person who had originally asked me about Isagenix, the blog owner, and I were all operating in the arena of science and evidence. Most of the commenters were operating in a whole different universe of discourse based on belief, hope, hearsay, and personal experience. Science is like a foreign language to them, and they were incapable of understanding my points. Pearls before swine...
Still asking the Hangover Gods for forgiveness? Ask a loved one to please prepare you a side of steamed asparagus with a protein-rich lunch. According to a study in the Journal of Food Science, the amino acids and minerals found in asparagus may alleviate hangover symptoms and protect liver cells against toxins. The veggie spears are also a natural diuretic, which will help flush the excess toxins from your system. Avoiding starchy carbs will help to further relieve your body of bloat, while protein—rich in vitamin B6 and amino acids—will help to alleviate groggy hangover symptoms.
Do not use if safety seal is broken. Do not exceed recommended daily intake. Do not use if you are pregnant or nursing. Not intended for use by persons under 18 years of age. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. This product is not intended to be used without breaks. Cascara sagrada belongs to a family of plants containing compounds with laxative effects. With long-term use without breaks, this ingredient may interfere with diagnostic imaging procedures of the colon. Taking a break of 30 or more days between use cycles will help maintain natural regularity. Not intended for long-term use.,
This 9-day cleanse really lasts for 11 days. The first two days are “shake” days, which is a combination of drinking a shake for breakfast, eating a light, low-glycemic lunch, and drinking a shake for dinner. And in between you can eat Isagenix Snacks, which remind me of my dog’s vitamins, but actually have proven to be quite tasty. (But who knows, maybe I only liked the taste because I had forgotten what good food tastes like), drink lots of water, and take capsules that are meant to speed up your metabolism and give you energy.
Alcohol is particularly bad for your weight because it’s a toxin. Your body mobilizes to burn off the calories in alcohol as quickly as possible—ignoring any other calories that might have come along with it. So whether it’s wine and cheese or beer and wings, the body metabolizes the drink while shoving more of the accompanying food calories into fat cells.
Lastly, length of time in this industry does not mean you know about nutrition (or maybe you do and still sell Isagenix for financial benefit). “if you think that “WHOLE” foods are something that the average person can afford to put in their body and get as much nutrition as in just 1 shake by Isagenix, then you are sorely mistaken.” So the average person can afford to spend hundreds of dollars a month on these products full of synthetic vitamins that can’t be absorbed? That doesn’t even make sense.
Not everyone has fresh raw milk at their fingertips and some of the other ingredients, like grass fed meat. But you can get a lot of protein from organic produce. The big thing about Isagenix is the amino acids. Amino acids are protein. But you can lose weight with organic bone broth too. There are a hundred ways to lose weight without eating synthetic concoctions.
At the company’s Top Achiever’s 2014 event, Isagenix Chief Science Officer Suk Cho, Ph.D., said Dr. Paul topped the selection process for a research partnership because of his “extensive background in researching and designing programs that optimize nutrition and athletic performance.” Although Skidmore College could be considered a “small school,” Dr. Cho said, their lab has invested in some of the most advanced equipment, including dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) machines, for measuring total body composition.
Wow. Just wow. Dani, first of all – my hat is off to you for sticking to your guns. Secondly – I totally agree – eating healthy organic locally sourced food is your best bet for health – that and unlearning some serious misinformation about fat, cholesterol and sugar. Finally, it is an unfortunate reality that many things in life are corrupted by the profit motive – at times to such an extent that decent people are caught up in the craze to just make a quick buck or two. It is also unfortunate that so many people are caught in the trap of ignorance, poverty or both – it is not cheap to feed a family on really healthy food, especially meat, produce. I’ve researched these topics and also the history behind American industrialized agriculture (e.g. Food, Inc., King Corn, etc) and am appalled at the corruption and overall insanity that has engulfed this nation. You can go just about anywhere else in the world and get healthy food quite easily – a expat friend of mine lives in Uruguay and is very happy with the situation there. So, hang in there and keep up the good work on your blog and getting the truth out. Do you know of Chris Kresser and his work?
With this new-found popularity, the number and type of cleanse diets has soared, from food-based "liver detoxes" to liquid-only fasts for several weeks and everything in between. While the extreme cleanses often get a bad rap—Beyonce confessed that drinking the maple syrup-lemon-cayenne pepper concoction made her "cranky"—many women swear by cleanse diets to lose weight, increase energy, and even help clear up acne.
Thank you for this article! I have been a very successful network marketer with both Beachbody and Visalus…I did help A LOT of people lose weight and “get healthy…-er” than they were. But through my OWN research and dissecting each ingredient in the products I consume as I became more interested in researching all of the supposed healthy ingredients, I have found that google does a body good! If you copy and paste the ingredients into google and ask “IS ______(insert ingredient)___ non-gmo/organic?” you will get ALL sorts of reliable info. I have YET to find an MLM that produces a truly NON-GMO and Certified Organic product. Now, some claim they do…but their ingredients say otherwise. And let’s be real…every website is going to vouch for their product. What kind of company would they be if they outed themselves? Think about it!
I have been reading most of what has been published here … not all because WOW is there a ton of comments … talk about advertising, this could be taken and taught as a Master Class in Marketing … Anyway, I just wanted to make ONE THING PERFECTLY CLEAR and I will be brief and not include links or anything of the like. Anyone who has a Professional Degree, Certification, a Doctor, Scientist etc. CANNOT make false claims … cannot report product ingredients that DONT exist. They simply cannot make reports, claims or put ANYTHING in WRITING that has not been validated or proven by a governing body – ESPECIALLY FOOD; and food that is allowed to be sold to the general public. They will stand to lose their careers, reputation, business, livelihood (and I’m sure most of these professionals do not want to lose their livelihood) … that said, it is profoundly irrelevant if Isagenix Sponsors a study or not … the Doctor or Scientist who puts his/her name to it will be held accountable if their reporting is inaccurate – this is not arguable. And for those of you who will say that they just get paid off to report whatever the Company in questions asks them to do – I’m sure I will also see you rallying at the next UFO pick-up point, or stocking your fallout shelter for the coming “End of Days” ushered forth by the “One World Government.” So, while I like some of the points you make Dani, you cannot deflate and set aside information because it came from the Isagenix website or further, you cannot discredit any information source because it comes from the producer of the product (let me be clear, I am speaking only for the the FOOD WORLD here – not Spiderman toys, or toothbrush makers) – do you really believe that the world, the government, will allow just any LARGE organization to produce whatever FOODS they want, however they want to, without any organized, highly educated Governing Body to be held accountable to? Just to make money? If so, then see you at the rally.

When you challenge a way people think and what they have been led to believe their entire life, it scares them to think they’ve been lied to (medical field, food manufacturers–I mean, really? If the food has been manufactured and made in a factory, how CAN that be REAL food?, people and corporations and chemical companies “out to feed the world and raise more food”–how is that working out for us, when we have people literally starving all over the world?). The whole concept of everything people have been told, taught, and have done their entire life isn’t necessarily the right or correct thing to be doing.
The plural of anecdote is not data. Two commenters appropriately objected to all this testimonial evidence. They pointed out that testimonials are unreliable and subject to post hoc ergo propter hoc error, that all the “it works for me” comments can be attributed to a low-calorie diet and exercise, and that the testimonials are almost exclusively from people who are selling the product.
I’m not sure if your brain isn’t properly functioning due to taking Isagenix for almost five years, but the ingredient lists were pulled directly from the Isagenix website and I really don’t appreciate being called a liar. Anyone who has the basic ability to read can see the list of sources I used to provide the ingredient lists. So to say that the ingredient lists are fake (when I clearly provided links for them that go to the Isagenix website) is basically an admission that you know the ingredients are garbage.
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