Do your research and make your own decisions. Recently, a peer reviewed jounral article was released which was also funded by industry,(Isagenix) so there couldn’t possibly be any bias (insert sarcasm). Results did show the groups lost a significant amount of weight, but if you look at the weight loss in relationship to total kcals taken in on a daily basis (1000-1200) of course they will lose weigth! DUH!!!! I would be surprised if Isagenix used this study to solidify the use of their products.
Actually losing 1lb per day is unhealthy even if you are overweight. If you are losing any more than 3lb per week you are more than likely losing muscle mass and not fat. Healthy weight loss should be steady and maintainable. You shouldn’t be consuming less than your base metabolic rate unless advised to do so by a qualified health professional – and there are very few situations in which they will advise you to do so.
Lastly, there is the detoxification that can take place on Cleanse Days. Often misunderstood, improved detoxification (or the increased efficiency of phase 1, 2, and 3 enzyme systems) while on Cleanse Days may be one of the most fascinating parts of the scientific story behind Cleanse Days. Nutritional support in the form of antioxidant vitamins and botanicals is essential in the detoxification process because some toxins are produced as the result of free radical activity. Additionally, nutritional support is needed to counteract the oxidative damage caused by toxins.

Thank you for writing this article & correctly informing people on why these fad “food” replacements are nothing more than marketing gimmicks. I have been consuming a mostly plant-based diet all my life & have recently (over the past year) switched to a strictly plant-based diet. I only consume whole, unprocessed, organic foods. The produce section at my local supermarket has become my second home. The reason why I came across your article is because I was recently told by my doctor that I should try Isagenix. I knew right away that I would not be consuming this filth but I just wanted to research exactly why it’s bad for you. I was SHOCKED that a doctor would recommend this. He told me that I would have more energy & that fasting is good because if you consume a high quantity of food then your body is too busy digesting it rather than repairing itself. This doctor clearly has no idea what he’s talking about & should be ashamed of himself for recommending this junk to his patients. I wish I could forward him this article. I will stick to eating REAL, whole food that is free of toxins and pesticides. Like you and Dr.Fuhrman say, there is no magic pill or shake for weight loss. Proper nutrition comes from real, wholesome food, not synthetic and toxic products that are packaged in a pretty bottle or can. Thank you for educating the masses. The people that are leaving insulting comments just don’t want to believe that there isn’t a “quick fix” for weight loss. They are clearly brain-washed by the company’s brilliant marketing scheme so don’t even bother trying to argue with them. People need to spend less time and money on fad diets and synthetic products and more on trips to the local farmer’s market. It’s stupid simple, proper health equals proper nutrition that comes from real food (i.e. fruits and vegetables). Thanks for writing this article!


So far, the meta-analyses and systematic reviews on randomized, placebo-controlled feeding trials comparing fructose to other carbohydrates have not revealed to have any quantitatively meaningful metabolic effects. That is, fructose has demonstrated no significant effect on body weight, blood pressure, or uric acid in calorie-controlled trials. On the other hand, fructose demonstrated improvement of glycemic control at levels comparable to that obtained in fruit.
Thank you for writing this article & correctly informing people on why these fad “food” replacements are nothing more than marketing gimmicks. I have been consuming a mostly plant-based diet all my life & have recently (over the past year) switched to a strictly plant-based diet. I only consume whole, unprocessed, organic foods. The produce section at my local supermarket has become my second home. The reason why I came across your article is because I was recently told by my doctor that I should try Isagenix. I knew right away that I would not be consuming this filth but I just wanted to research exactly why it’s bad for you. I was SHOCKED that a doctor would recommend this. He told me that I would have more energy & that fasting is good because if you consume a high quantity of food then your body is too busy digesting it rather than repairing itself. This doctor clearly has no idea what he’s talking about & should be ashamed of himself for recommending this junk to his patients. I wish I could forward him this article. I will stick to eating REAL, whole food that is free of toxins and pesticides. Like you and Dr.Fuhrman say, there is no magic pill or shake for weight loss. Proper nutrition comes from real, wholesome food, not synthetic and toxic products that are packaged in a pretty bottle or can. Thank you for educating the masses. The people that are leaving insulting comments just don’t want to believe that there isn’t a “quick fix” for weight loss. They are clearly brain-washed by the company’s brilliant marketing scheme so don’t even bother trying to argue with them. People need to spend less time and money on fad diets and synthetic products and more on trips to the local farmer’s market. It’s stupid simple, proper health equals proper nutrition that comes from real food (i.e. fruits and vegetables). Thanks for writing this article!
In 2012, as a recap, Isagenix reached a major milestone when a UIC-conducted clinical study comparing an Isagenix system to a top, physician-prescribed “heart healthy diet” was published in two high-profile, peer-reviewed journals, Nutrition & Metabolism and Nutrition Journal. The UIC study also won a prestigious award in obesity research at the American Society for Nutrition’s annual meeting at the Experimental Biology conference in 2013.
I represent another type of Isagenix victim – the discarded parent of an adult completely taken in by the cult. I was able to recognize immediately that Isagenix was a pyramid scheme, even before I researched their products. Multi-level marketing is just a euphemism for the slightly modified language of disreputable companies to avoid pyramid lawsuits, but the scam is the same. The promise of certain wealth and success for those who will spend hundreds per month and thousands per year of their dollars to attempt to reach those goals is supplemented by their psychological programming – videos, conference calls, meetings, etc. – the goal of which is to convince the unwitting marks that the company people who support them and encourage them are doing so out of the goodness of their hearts because they care about them. Anything less than the constant “Rah Rah” of the Isagenix con-artists, they are told, is evidence of non-support and a barrier to their success to be avoided. At first, the subject was avoided, then there was slight distancing, then, after 2 years of not jumping on the bandwagon (and, by the way, not giving my child my SS#), three months ago I was told in a text that I no longer had a place in my child’s life, or the lives of my grandchildren. The two years of walking on eggshells and hoping the cult would lose its grip on the child we raised are over. Now, nothing short of deprogramming will change things. Our family can not be the only one to suffer this fate. I wish I knew of a place to publish a detailed condemnation of how Isagenix, and other scammers, brainwashing of vulnerable people – all of the people that they hook are vulnerable to one degree or another else why would they fall for the “get rich quick” narrative – to reject and avoid those who don’t join them on the Ponzi train, even family. Make no mistake, everything about Isagenix “marketing training” is from the same playbook used by cult leaders. I wish there was a source for actual data of how much money was spent and lost by their victims who tried their program and failed. I also wish there was a support group for parents like us who lost beloved members of their family as the thrall of the scam engulfed a child they raised and loved dearly for decades. The grief is enormous, especially since it must be borne in silence.
Your morning snack and lunch will consist of a Zero Belly Drink. Each delivers the three core nutrients (protein, fiber, and fat), and is based on plant protein, which reduces both sugar and bloating that you often get from whey-based proteins. Vega Sport and Sun Warrior are two of my favorite brands. Since the drinks average about 230 calories each, this step alone will cut about 500 to 1,000 calories out of your daily intake, which may take several additional pounds off your body in just seven days. The drink recipes at right pack such a nutritional punch that you’ll know you’re getting the vitamins, minerals, protein and healthy fats you need. Before each meal or snack, ask these three questions: Where’s my protein? Where’s my fiber? Where’s my healthy fat? Check out our picks for the 4 Best Zero Belly Smoothies for Weight Loss.
Notice: Dr. Daniel Pompa is licensed by the Pastoral Medical Association (PMA) as a Doctor of Pastoral Science & Medicine (PSc.D) to provide PS&M services to health-conscious individuals seeking natural, scripturally-based approaches for addressing chronic health conditions. Dr. Pompa’s services are provided to individual clients pursuant to the PMA Practitioner-Client “Agreement for Wellness Services.” For your reference, detailed information about Pastoral Science & Medicine and the benefits of subscribing to PMA’s Health Network are available on PMA’s website. If you have a complaint about our services or you wish to check the status of our license, you should contact the Pastoral Medical Association.
Thanks for the article, Dani. I really appreciate the insight. I am always entertained by the constant back and forth. I tried Isagenix because a friend of mine has been using it and having a great deal of success. Since January, I have been trying to really get my health and weight under control. I had a real unhealthy lifestyle (eating like crap and very little exercise) and was bound and determined to get it under control. I started Isagenix in February (after a solid month of clean eating and exercising 6 days a week), and experienced a great deal of success in the first week and a half. I had more energy and my body was feeling great. However, after that first week and a half, I experienced serious hunger and harsh digestion reactions. It was really a struggle to follow the plan and all of the suggestions that my friend gave me. I felt like my body was holding onto everything I ate (or drank) – I was exhausted all of the time, dizzy, and constantly hungry.
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I cheated, and I hate myself for it. I drank a half a cup of a chai latte with skim milk. (I can’t even believe I’m saying this.) Rewind two weeks ago, and I was drinking grande-white-chocolate-mochas-with-whole-milk-and-whipped-cream on the daily; sometimes even twice a day if I wanted a sugar high mid-afternoon. The culprit on day 7: an outing with my friend, Stephanie. You can have green tea on these cleanses, but the café we went to didn’t have such a thing. I drank the chai latte reluctantly, guilt-ridden, and hurting (mentally) later. I felt like I had failed. No will power here.
I think that people can go back and forth on this issue until each is blue in the face. All I know is if something seems too good to be true, then it probably is. I do not use, sell, or have an affiliation with any diet, supplement, nutritional program at this time, and as a person who would love to change some things about themself, I can see how people fall for this stuff all the time (I admit I used to be one of those people because of desperation).
I finally went to the doctor (primarily because I was having allergy issues) and talked to him about what I was experiencing with Isagenix. He said that since I was exercising regularly and eating better, my metabolism was really kicking back up (I had a really high metabolism in high school and activity has always helped me), and as a result, my body was burning through everything I was eating and drinking pretty rapidly. My body was not getting enough food and nutrients, and essentially, starting to go into starvation mode. He advised me to stop using Isagenix, because I would start to do damage to my body. I have since sent it back.
Your article is nothing short of fear-mongering. You prey on uneducated people who fail to research information for themselves and instead want to rely on you because you are a Certified Nutrition Consultant. If you want to use your title to help people, then do it, but lose the fear-mongering. Some of us don’t believe people just because of the title on their articles, or even the credentials they carry. A bit of research that barely took 30 minutes and 1 visit to the isagenix website solely to see that there are 11 grams of sugar in the shake (only part of which is fructose.)
Do you know how many great, healthy meals you could make for the same price people are spending on this crap? Look for products with less than 5 ingredients, all that you can pronounce…It’s not that tough. Blows my mind. Or how about this…invest in a personal trainer and get your butt off the couch? Here’s another thought, higher a nutritionist or dietitian. It’s not that hard. Eat clean, exercise to the best of your ability, and stop looking for the magic pill.
This easy a.m. ritual works on two levels. First, a recent study found that exposure to UV rays, even on a cloudy day, between the hours of 8 am and noon reduces your risk of weight gain regardless of activity level, caloric intake, or age. Researchers speculate that the morning light synchronizes your metabolism and undercuts your fat genes. And burning calories before you eat means you’re exercising in a fasted state—the energy you burn comes right from your fat stores instead of the glucose still in your system. According to some studies, exercising in a fasted state can burn almost 20 percent more fat compared to exercising with fuel in the tank.
I have actually taking Isagenix to a nutritionist and she told me how horrible it was. I even had it tested on me through Nutrition Response Testing ( NRT) and it was a fail, my body did not like it. So she is absolutely right. The stuff is pure crap. Do a standard process cleanse instead. The company is very reputable and only give accounts to nutritionist and nutrition student. That in it’s self tells you how good their products are. There is no pyramid scheme involved. Isagenix doesn’t care about your health they only want to make money that is why there products are crap. Synthetic vitamins are used and synthetic vitamins have been shown to cause disease ( ex. Synthetic vitamin E has been shown to increase your risk of heart disease where whole food vitamin E has been shown to decrease heart disease. See the difference. I have messed up my endocrine system from using things like herbal life and other “natural” weight loss supplements. I only take whole food supplements now.
Pomegranate contains vitamins C and K, folate, proteins, fiber, and potassium. Punicalagins present in pomegranate are antioxidants and help boost the overall immunity. Pomegranate prevents type II diabetes, cancer (prostate and breast), and heart disease. It is also beneficial for those who have arthritis, blood pressure, skin diseases, and cognitive disorders. It improves memory and blood circulation (19).
This 9-day cleanse really lasts for 11 days. The first two days are “shake” days, which is a combination of drinking a shake for breakfast, eating a light, low-glycemic lunch, and drinking a shake for dinner. And in between you can eat Isagenix Snacks, which remind me of my dog’s vitamins, but actually have proven to be quite tasty. (But who knows, maybe I only liked the taste because I had forgotten what good food tastes like), drink lots of water, and take capsules that are meant to speed up your metabolism and give you energy.
Once again, when you are in a position where people look to you for advice, you have to present ALL the information. I feel that you have an opinion about Shake-based supplements in general and have made an assumption that this one is no different. In your charge to prove your assumption right, the perception is that you select to share only the information that supports your position and ignore or suppress that which contradicts it.
The Isagenix model is to turn as many customers as possible into supplement dealers armed with nothing but slick marketing materials and ZERO qualifications. I know multiple people who peddle this stuff, and not one of them has any kind of qualifications related to health, nutrition or fitness. The things I hear them tell people is not only beyond scary, I have had to intervene and stop multiple sales that would have had negative impacts on known health conditions (ie: sale of e-shots to someone with hypertension, and whey protein concentrate to someone who everyone knows is lactose intolerant….they didn’t even know that whey concentrate still has lactose, or that whey was dairy for that matter!!!!)
Ditch the packaged, processed foods today (even the “healthy” versions). This will ensure you are taking out excess sodium, artificial ingredients and sugar from your diet. Also, ditch the salt shaker and instead use only herbs and spices to flavor your food. You’ll find this can help make a big difference in how you look and feel. Even after one day!
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