It depends on which 'program' you choose. The nine-day cleansing program, with products to "support healthy energy and help satisfy hunger", retails for $260, while a 30-day cleanse is $490. There's also a variety of products and product combinations on sale that retail from $29 for a single product to $783.00 for the 'Presidents Pak', which "combines best-selling products with proven marketing tools".

I too agree with all that you have said. I have trialled both Herbalife and Isagenix for my own research as I am in the fitness industry. I have gotten more success from telling people to eat a balanced diet of whole foods and the occasional supplemental vitamins (relevant to the goal e.g.. weight loss or muscle gain etc). Whats even worse now is that Personal Trainers are the target to further promote it as the age old saying that ‘my trainer said it was what i should eat’. Shame shame shame to those trainers that do this. They do this to also get more financial benefits from the products as we all low with this multi-level marketing (pyramid scheme).


Furthermore…… to all the people out there who have been quite arrogant in some of these posts, but saying that Dani knows nothing…………. I do not know this lady, but I do know my family GP very well and i have no reason to doubt her. My recent blood results did show a change in the Vitamin D level, but that was purely down to the fact I had a Vitamin D injection to cover me for 6 months (rather than take daily supplements). Other than that…. NO Change anywhere. I can honestly say, this system did not work for me.
2 things about this article – firstly this blog clearly states that Dani is paid by products to endorse their products which means she is a paid blogger, who gets paid to write about products or write against them. I know because I hire bloggers for a living, it’s a great way to make money but it doesn’t mean they know everything about the nutrition side.
The second link you provide by David Despain is the science and communications spokesperson for Isagenix, what irony. Now he would be a good person to contact to raise your concerns:): This link doesn’t support your argument at all. quoting the first paragraph “It was the most recent of several review papers to conclude that fructose is probably not inherently fattening in humans, but that it can be fattening if it’s consumed to excess, due to the added calories”
“Most people only absorb 8% to 12% of what we eat – the rest is waste which we flush down the toilet. With Isagenix we can absorb up to 94% of what is ingested with less waste going down the toilet. Isagenix is full of good probiotics which help rebuild our digestive systems, fights candida. Isagenix also helps the body become alkaline, which is a healthy body. John Hopkins 2008 Cancer Report stated that cancer cannot live in an alkaline body only acidic bodies. Processed food makes our bodies acidic — thus the epedemic [sic] of cancer and diabites [sic] in the USA along with heart disease.” [This is all nonsense.]
The udder produces milk based on the “demand”. If the udder is “stripped” or milked out at least once or twice a day, the udder will continue to produce milk to the udder’s capacity. It is the reduction of demand that naturally occurs as the calf grows and begins nibbling on other things, establishing a cud, developing their rumen, reducing their intake of mom’s milk and increasing their graze/grass/hay (long & short fiber) that signals the udder to cut back on it’s production. A calf is usually weaned, at the very latest, by 5 – 6 months old.
They advertise “no caffeine added” for a product that contains green tea; green tea contains caffeine. They repeat the tired old myth that our food isn’t as nutritious as in the “good old days.” They put digestive enzymes in their products to help you assimilate them, not realizing that orally ingested digestive enzymes are themselves digested in the stomach before they can do anything. They say that their electrolytes “ignite the body’s electrical system” — I have no idea what this means, and it certainly is not scientific terminology.
Your comment on nonfat dry milk confuses me as you’re saying it’s denatured protein. This product, as it states in your heading, says ‘Low heat nonfat dry milk’. What I know about ‘low heat’ dry milk is that is classified as ‘Grade A’ or ‘Extra Grade’ and is required to contain a minimum 6.00 mg of undenatured whey protein nitrogen. This not classed as denatured. In addition, the theoretical ‘oxidised cholesterol’ contained in nonfat dry milk is negligible, particularly as in this instance low heat nonfat dry milk is not the product’s main ingredient. You say are sceptical about the pasture-fed cows but there is no evidence to suggest it is sourced from anywhere else. If your grocer tells you their spinach is locally grown and organic, do you follow the delivery van back to farm to see if they’re telling the truth? Do you stand in the farms and factories and watch the process of each and every product you buy to make sure they are doing what they claim? Who does that? We are all at the mercy of whatever our food labels and sellers tell us, along with some government rules and regulations to keep them in check.
I’m immoral for highlighting the fact that people who know nothing about nutrition are often duped into buying these products that are touted as healthy when they’re anything but? For giving people the tools to recognize unhealthy ingredients in their overpriced protein shakes? Mind you – I give away all of this information for free, and I’m immoral?
I cheated, and I hate myself for it. I drank a half a cup of a chai latte with skim milk. (I can’t even believe I’m saying this.) Rewind two weeks ago, and I was drinking grande-white-chocolate-mochas-with-whole-milk-and-whipped-cream on the daily; sometimes even twice a day if I wanted a sugar high mid-afternoon. The culprit on day 7: an outing with my friend, Stephanie. You can have green tea on these cleanses, but the café we went to didn’t have such a thing. I drank the chai latte reluctantly, guilt-ridden, and hurting (mentally) later. I felt like I had failed. No will power here.
You can’t just write “Fact:” and it be true, where are your resources and your qualifications?? This is the kind of uneducated response that makes false information continue to be spread. There is obviously no reason to argue with you as you are clearly one of those people who are always right even when smacked in the face with some contradicting evidence. I wonder if back in the day you would have been on the ‘world is flat’ commonsense bandwagon.
Many of the commenters seemed to think that doctors know nothing about nutrition. Doctors just put bandages on problems: they sell pills that mask symptoms and wreak havoc on your body instead of treating underlying causes. They only want to make money. They want to keep people sick so they won't lose their kickbacks. [What kickbacks?] There are lots of malpractice suits.
Lastly, a word to other ISA users who feel the need to defend to product. I hear, ya. I’ve seen the testimonials and read the info and know many people have changed their lives. I hear ya, but hear me. If you’re going to dispute, debate, or otherwise comment, please at least do so in a respectful manner. No part of Dani’s original blog post was lashing at any of us personally, and frankly some of your responses are embarrassing by affiliation. Calm down and realize that knowledge is a great thing, and often times knowledge we initially disagree with can often be the most important kind.
It’s refreshing reading articles that are truthful and honest. From one Holistic Health Coach to another, thank you for spreading the word and educating people. I am trying to do the same thing and I always have people asking me me questions but when I give them the answer that they don’t want to hear, I get the rolling eyes and attitude and that includes family members. I don’t tell people what they want to hear, I give the facts and if they disagree, so be it. I really enjoyed your article. Keep spreading the word!
Thank you for this article! I have been a very successful network marketer with both Beachbody and Visalus…I did help A LOT of people lose weight and “get healthy…-er” than they were. But through my OWN research and dissecting each ingredient in the products I consume as I became more interested in researching all of the supposed healthy ingredients, I have found that google does a body good! If you copy and paste the ingredients into google and ask “IS ______(insert ingredient)___ non-gmo/organic?” you will get ALL sorts of reliable info. I have YET to find an MLM that produces a truly NON-GMO and Certified Organic product. Now, some claim they do…but their ingredients say otherwise. And let’s be real…every website is going to vouch for their product. What kind of company would they be if they outed themselves? Think about it!
Feel free to try to defend processed, refined and all-around crappy ingredients. I have made my stance on each of these things abundantly clear, and quite frankly i’m tired of repeating myself. If you have further questions, please refer to the approximate one million responses I’ve left to other people spouting the same false information and complete lack of logic, science and common sense that you just did. AND I MEAN THIS NICELY AND AS MOTIVATION.
I tried Isagenix because all over my facebook, people were posting about all this success that they were having etc. I was very reluctant to try it, but I finally gave in, because in March 2013, I had rotator cuff surgery and was not cleared for any exercise until almost a year later. I gained a lot of weight during that time and I was miserable. It was affecting my relationship with my boyfriend and I was desperate.
This is the kind of information I was looking for. I found it very strange how few negative reviews were available for Isagenix system. I am from the “school” of where if something seems too good to be true, it is because it IS too good to be true. 400 dollars for a 30 day system sounds to me like a rotten pyramid scheme with a frantic dietary fad.
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