I have been looking for unbiased information about Isagenix and when I do and send it to the girl selling, she shoots it down claiming it’s all false, BUT yet can’t explain to me why I can’t find on the label that anything is organic and non gmo. Or that the whey is from grass fed cows in New Zealand. I found a whey product that puts that a label that their whey comes from grass feed cows, why can’t isagenix? And please no bs about getting their produce overseas and that’s why they can’t label. You know a company can’t claim they are organic or non gmo and it’s illegal to do so. I found only one item in their site that loosely states that they “try” to be non gmo what does that mean?
You have an interesting perspective on my previous post about what the scientific community is saying about Isagenix. I can see how you might arrive at the opinion that all the experts are involved with Isagenix and therefore must be lying simply in order to promote the company and its products, thus putting their credentials and reputations in jeopardy if they are wrong.

I will not disagree with you that a clean, whole foods organic diet is the best way to go. No argument there. Nor am I a user of Isagenix or a promoter of it. I live in an area with lots of people promoting the local sources only, organic only, and often vegan or cruelty-free lifestyles. And I always find it interesting that many will speak out vehemently against processed foods, products like Isagenix, Herbalife, etc. because of ingredients like the ones you have listed in your article, and they will defend the necessity to regulate the food you put in your body with an intense level of passion (which is good, what we put into our bodies is of the utmost importance). But then they will pump their bodies full of synthetic, often dangerous and sometimes even fatal, chemicals and hormones with a long history of horrendous side effects (such as birth control and vaccines), without a second thought.
You have listed the ‘common ingredients’ which you are objecting to but most of them aren’t even in the ingredient list of the products you pasted up… wow.. and like Tanya said, what are you credentials? You have said you know what you are talking about but you don’t back that with any credentials or evidence. Isagenix is very carefully formulated by scientists and doctors and careful research is conducted. It looks to me like you clearly have some info about eating whole foods which is great, but you are just against shakes… and I totally agree, I think shake diets are very bad as they lack nutrients and are filled with rubbish but personally and professionally, isagenix has been clinically proven and it works and the research shows this clearly if you look harder and people look into it themselves thoroughly, not just go off a comment that anyone can make. Whole foods are great, but why are we putting on weight on whole foods if they are so good for us and you said yourself the soil is depleted. I wish you well in your journey and hope you are able to look further into this with an open mind.
I would also like to share that I’m new to Isagenix (a couple weeks) AND I agree with you on some of the product ingredients. I even wrote an email to their support about their use of Palm Kernal Oil, not because of the ingredient itself, but because there’s a lot of controversy surrounding the areas where it’s grown. I’m not here to defend Isagenix. As I mentioned earlier, I agree. I read one comment earlier in which the person eluded to ISA as a transition. I would have to say that though it’s a shame some of these ingredients appear on some of the products, I’m happy to help some people take a step in the right direction. My mother for instance, addicted to coffee and sweets, can’t stand the thought of veggies, let alone raw and just in general practices poor eating habits. Yet, she’s feeling better already with ISA. Is it perfect? I’m not saying it is. I do hope, however, that it inspires her and other family members to continue on a path toward greater health and understanding of nutrition. But then, that’s not what what your blog post was about. It wasn’t created to argue the transitions of those in poorer health. It was simply created as an en devour into questionable ingredients. I will continue using it personally even, but I do so as part or a larger plan of general healthy eating practices. Are those practices perfect? No, sadly they aren’t. Personally, I’m doing the best I can, and the feedback I’m getting from family is that they’re feeling better. Is it a perfect solution? Again, nope, but it is a stepping stone towards one in my opinion. I will still also to encourage my family and friends to eat as organic as possible.
I have a similar opinion to Mickhael. You need to be more considered with your use of buzz words like toxic. Moderation is absolutely the key. If you drink too much water it is toxic. Yes maltodextrin is a food additive, one that serves a useful purpose as a thickener in some processed foods. I agree that processed foods should be limited, cooking with unprocessed ingredients is definitely the way to go. But I still eat processed foods in moderation because I enjoy them, and they serve a useful purpose on many occasions. I think you need to improve your understanding of a few nutrition topics (there are many that I need to improve my understanding of also, nutrition is a relatively new science).
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